foodstyling

Celeriac: The Other Root Vegetable

Baked Spiced Celeriac and Yam Fries  Photo by David Bishop

Baked Spiced Celeriac and Yam Fries

Photo by David Bishop

Celeriac Roots  Photo by David Bishop

Celeriac Roots

Photo by David Bishop

Celeriac, or celery root, is a kind of celery in the parsley family. It is cultivated for its flavorful and nutritious qualities, and can be used as a substitute for white potatoes, though it stands well on its own. Celeriac has less than half the calories of mature white potatoes and delicious. The stems and leaves look very similar to the common celery which is often eaten raw, used in salads and in recipes. Celeriac leaves can also be used in the same ways but more but with caution, since their flavor is much stronger. I like to use the leaves for garnish, either chopped or whole, and often mixed with chives or scallions.

Celeriac differs from most root vegetables in that it is not very starchy.It is low in carbs and calories, low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and is known to lower blood cholesterol, lessen the risk of stroke, heart attack and obesity, and reduce irritable bowel syndrome. It is high in Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Phosphorus, Potassium, Dietary Fiber, Vitamin B6, Magnesium and Manganese.  All of these qualities can greatly contribute to all over health and weight loss. 

 I have included four recipes and modes of preparing celeriac here for your pleasure and health, with the added benefit of beauty and style for entertainment.

 

Recipe for Baked Spiced Celeriac & Yam Fries Serves 4

  • Ingredients

  • 1 medium celeriac root

  • 1 medium yam – orange color for contrast

  • 2 Tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

  • Turmeric to taste

  • Paprika to taste

  • Course sea salt to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375”F

  2. Peel the yam with a vegetable peeler

  3. Peel the celeriac bulb with a paring knife

  4. Cut both root vegetables into large juliennes, about 3” X 1/2”

  5. In a bowl, toss the celeriac juliennes with the lemon juice

  6. Boil the celeriac juliennes for about 20 minutes and drain well

  7. Boil the yams for a bout 15 minutes and drain well

  8. Dry both root juliennes well and toss with just enough olive oil to coat the fries

  9. Line 2 sheet pans with parchment paper

  10. Lay the celeriac onto one pan, single file and the yams onto the other

  11. Sprinkle the celeriac strips with turmeric and the yams with paprika, turning to cover all sides lightly.

  12. Sprinkle all of the juliennes lightly with flaked sea salt on all sides

  13. Bake in a the oven for 20 minutes, turning the fries over about 1/2 way through to brown all sides

  14. Serve immediately

Herbed Celeriac Chips   Photo by David Bishop

Herbed Celeriac Chips

Photo by David Bishop

Celeriac chips as a substitute for potato chips is a very smart choice in so many ways. First there is the calorie count. Raw, celeriac has 66 calories per cup while white potatoes have 142 calories per cup. Celeriac is high in both soluble and insoluble fiber, which is essential for not just colon health, but the all over health of the body, including diabetes reduction, lessening the threat of heart attach, stroke, obesity and irritable bowel syndrome. See http://www.webmd.com/diet/fiber-health-benefits-11/insoluble-soluble-fiber Dietary Fiber: Insoluble vs. Soluble

 

Recipe for Herbed Celeriac Chips Snacks for 2

 Ingredients

  • 2 quarts canola oil

  • 2 small celeriac bulbs, peeled

  • ¼ cup freshly minced flat parsley

  • Sprinkle grated Romano cheese to taste

  • Flaked sea salt to taste

Directions

  1. Heat the canola oil in a fryer or a deep pot to 375”F.

  2. Keep track of the temperature with a good insertion thermometer. If you are using a pot on your stove, keep a lid nearby in case a spill causes a fire in the oil. Putting a lid on the pot immediately will extinguish a flame.

  3. Cut the peeled celeriac root in half to make it easier to shave

  4. Shave the celeriac root with a vegetable peeler, or cut it very thinly with a really sharp knife

  5. Fry the slices until they are golden brown on the edges, in small batches. Do not crowd the fryer

  6. Drain the crisps on paper towel lined baking sheets

  7. Sprinkle immediately with flaked sea salt

  8. Sprinkle with minced parsley and grated Romano cheese if desired

Celeriac and Pear Soup with Pickled Red Onions  Photo by David Bishop

Celeriac and Pear Soup with Pickled Red Onions

Photo by David Bishop

This Recipe for Celeriac and Pear Soup is delicious served hot, cold, or at room temperature, making it a truly versatile starter, snack or lunch. The pickled red onion adds a sweet, tart, salty zazz that punches the flavor level up to excellence, balancing and harmonizing with the celeriac, pears and shallots.

 

Recipes for Celeriac & Pear Soup with Pickled Red Onions Serves 2-4

Ingredients for Pickled Red Onions

  • 1 small red onion, peeled and sliced very thinly

  • 1 cup white grape juice

  • ½ cup of red wine vinegar

  • ¼ cup honey

  • ½ teaspoon sea salt

  • ¼ teaspoon mustard seeds

  • ¼ teaspoon coriander seeds

  • ¼ teaspoon celery seeds

Directions for Pickled Red Onions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a quart size sauce pan

  2. Boil for about five minutes

  3. Remove the onions with a slotted spoon to a plate to allow to cool, laying them out as separately as possible

Ingredients for Celeriac & Pear Soup

  • 1 quart of free-range chicken broth

  • 2 medium celeriac bulbs, peeled and diced into one inch cubes

  • 2 ripe pears diced into one-inch cubes (I used the Bartlett variety for their sweetness and golden blushed pink skin)

  • 2 shallots, peeled and sliced thinly

  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions for Celeriac & Pear Soup

  1. Boil the celeriac and seasonings in the chicken broth for about 15 minutes or until just tender to a fork and bite

  2. Add in the pears and continue to lightly boil for another 5 minutes.

  3. With a slotted spoon, remove about a cup of the solid pieces in the soup to a small bowl and reserve

  4. Puree the remaining soup in a blender or with a stick hand blender

  5. Add back into the soup, the reserved solid pieces and stir to incorporate

  6. Serve into shallow soup bowls and garnish with Pickled Red Onions and chives

Mashed Celeriac and Carrots

Mashed Celeriac and Carrots

Mashed Celeriac and Carrots Serves 4-6

 Ingredients

  • 2 quarts salted boiling water

  • 4 medium bulbs of celeriac diced into one inch cubes

  • 2 large carrots, chopped into one inch pieces

  • 1 medium onion medium coarsely chopped

  • 1 chopped shallot

  • 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil plus additional for garnish

  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric

  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

  • Sea Salt to taste

Directions

  1. Boil all the ingredients until they are soft enough to mash.

  2. Drain the cooked vegetables, reserving the liquid.

  3. Mash the vegetables in a bowl with a hand masher or fork, adding back in the liquid as needed for your desired consistency.

  4. Arrange the mash gracefully in a serving bowl. Drizzle with additional olive oil.

  5. For more eye appeal, garnish with chopped scallions, sea salt flakes and dash of pepper.

Tip: Celeriac is also wonderful grated raw into salads. Have fun creating your own recipe renditions with this intriguing, delicious and healthful vegetable.

A Jubilant July Picnic at Coastal Maine’s Mead Meadow

Part 2: Seafood Appetizers

 

Photos by Michael Marquand  Recipes by Marilinda Hodgdon  Welcome to Part 2 of our Southern Maine picnic, inspired by the glorious fresh bounty of July by the sea. In the last post I presented the Red, White and Blue Sparkling Prosecco and Lambrusco Sangrias to sip with our seafood appetizers. In this post I present the appetizers: my versions of oysters on the half shell with mignonette sauce and lobster claw and pea puree crostini.  The fresh oysters on the half shell are adorned with a colorful mignonette sauce, made of freshly snipped chives from Mead Meadow’s herb garden, minced mini cucumbers, crushed pink peppercorns and Moscatel wine vinegar.

Photos by Michael Marquand

Recipes by Marilinda Hodgdon

Welcome to Part 2 of our Southern Maine picnic, inspired by the glorious fresh bounty of July by the sea. In the last post I presented the Red, White and Blue Sparkling Prosecco and Lambrusco Sangrias to sip with our seafood appetizers. In this post I present the appetizers: my versions of oysters on the half shell with mignonette sauce and lobster claw and pea puree crostini.

The fresh oysters on the half shell are adorned with a colorful mignonette sauce, made of freshly snipped chives from Mead Meadow’s herb garden, minced mini cucumbers, crushed pink peppercorns and Moscatel wine vinegar.

The sourdough crostini slices are loaded with a pureè of shallot and fresh English peas. The freshly caught local lobster claws nestle into the pea pureè . The claws are draped with lemony Amontillado Hollandaise sauce and are garnished with fresh pea tendrils. The local seafood vender graciously sold us just the claws we wanted by simply putting our order in a couple of days ahead. Some shops carry fresh containers of just claws, since they also sell just the tails. Because we ordered ahead of time, we were able to ask them to be careful to keep the claws as intact as possible for our aesthetic purposes. Some were a little ripped or separated, but I made due by covering those spots with the sauce. Angela of Mead Meadow grew the peas herself, on my request, to make sure we would have the pods and tendrils for our shoot. In spring and early summer they are plentiful in most markets these days.

The sourdough crostini slices are loaded with a pureè of shallot and fresh English peas. The freshly caught local lobster claws nestle into the pea pureè . The claws are draped with lemony Amontillado Hollandaise sauce and are garnished with fresh pea tendrils. The local seafood vender graciously sold us just the claws we wanted by simply putting our order in a couple of days ahead. Some shops carry fresh containers of just claws, since they also sell just the tails. Because we ordered ahead of time, we were able to ask them to be careful to keep the claws as intact as possible for our aesthetic purposes. Some were a little ripped or separated, but I made due by covering those spots with the sauce. Angela of Mead Meadow grew the peas herself, on my request, to make sure we would have the pods and tendrils for our shoot. In spring and early summer they are plentiful in most markets these days.

Lobster Pea Crostini.jpg

Recipes

 Maine Oysters on the Half Shell with Mignonette of Chives, Minced Cucumbers and Crushed Pink Peppercorns

 Ingredients

·      24 small Maine Oysters

·      1 Lb. Coarse Sea Salt for presentation

Mignonette Sauce

·      1 cup of Moscatel or Sherry Wine Vinegar

·      Small Bunch of Chives

·      1 Tablespoon of Pink Peppercorns

·      One small Persian Cucumber

·      3 Medium Lemons to Make 24 Lemon Wedges

Directions

1.     Sort oysters to discard any dead.

2.     Wash oysters of any sand.

3.     Finely chop Chives.

4.     Finely mince Persian cucumbers, keeping the skin

5.     Crush the Pink Peppercorns

6.     Mix the Chives, Cucumbers and Crushed Pink Peppercorns with the Vinegar

7.     Open Oysters, reserving all liquid.

8.     Lay oysters on a bed of course salt and add the oyster liquid to the oysters.

9.     Spoon a small amount of the Mignonette sauce onto each oyster shell

 Serve immediately while cold with sparkling sangrias.

Lobster Claw Crostini with Fresh Pea Pureè and Lemony Hollandaise Sauce

 Freshly Purchased

 ·      20 Small Fresh Maine Lobster Claws

·      1-2 Sourdough Baguettes Sliced into ½ inch Diagonals

Pea Puree

Ingredients

  • 1 Pound of Fresh English Peas

  • 1 Quart of Water, Vegetable or Seafood Broth, or a mix of your choice

  • 2 Medium Shallots

  • ¼ cup of Amontillado Sherry

  • 1 Tablespoon Sea Salt

  • ½ Teaspoon Ground White Pepper

Directions

  1. Thinly slice the shallots.

  2. Sort the peas for any withered items.

  3. Wash the peas.

  4. In a medium large pot, bring the water and salt to a boil.

  5. Add the shallots and peas.

  6. When the peas are tender and still bright green, remove them & shallots to cold water to stop the cooking and preserve the color. Reserve a cup of the cooking liquid in a measuring cup.

  7. With a slotted spoon or spider add the cooled peas back into the cooled empty pot with the sherry and pepper.

  8. With an immersion blender pureè the peas, shallots and sherry, adding in cooking liquid as needed, until smooth.

  9. Season with additional sea salt & white pepper to taste, being very careful to allow for salt in the lobster and hollandaise.

Marilinda’s Hollandaise Sauce

 Ingredients

  • 4 free range organic egg yolks

  • ½ cup or more of plu gras (European Style) unsalted butter

  • ½ freshly squeezed lemon juice, or more to taste

  • 1 Tbs. Amontillado Sherry

  • 1/8 tsp of ground cayenne pepper

  • Pinch of sea salt to taste

Directions

  1. Beat egg yolks, lemon juice, cayenne pepper and salt together.

  2. Melt butter in a small pan over very low heat.

  3. Slowly whisk the butter into the egg yolk mixture until it is all incorporated.

  4. Keep whisking constantly until the egg yolks thicken the sauce to the desired consistency.

  5. Briskly whisk in warm sherry to flavor the sauce.

  6. Use the warm sauce immediately.

Tip: To thin and reheat congealed sauce, whisk in a tiny bit of warm water. Garnish             with fresh pea shoots and tendrils.

 To Assemble Crostini

  1. Slice the baguettes.

  2. Spread each slice with about 1-2 tablespoons of pea puree, depending on their size.

  3. Add one claw to each pureè topped slice.

  4. Spoon hollandaise over each of the claws

  5. Garnish with peas shoots and/or tendrils.

Stay tuned for my next post, Part 3 of our Picnic at Coastal Maine’s Mead Meadow. It will feature the main course of cheesy portobello burgers crowned by pickled red onions, avocado mash and baby arugula. The grilled vegetable sides are asparagus, fennel and leeks, accompanied by Moroccan spiced, grilled in their husks, corn on the cob.

Part 4, the finale to the feast, is homemade Maine blueberry cheesecake ice cream popsicles with a do-it-yourself dark chocolate magic shell coating.

 

Mead Meadow Boat House  A special heartfelt thanks to Angela Olsen Matthews and her husband, Peter Matthews, at  Mead Meadow  for their thoughtful and gracious generosity and hard work in hosting our scrumptious and serene summer picnic. You can visit Angela’s Instagram page @ MeadMeadow   About Mead Meadow   We were invited to historic Mead Meadow, in picturesque Kittery Maine, to shoot our delightful summer outdoor meal. This water front paradise is a restored 140 year old farmstead, originally a 20 acre estate, was called Mead Summer House. Included: the main house, a horse and buggy carriage house, which is now a guest cottage, a boat house and the original well. The lovingly restored buildings are now nestled on 4 acres of manicured grass surrounded by wild and cultivated flowers, raspberry bush stands

Mead Meadow Boat House

A special heartfelt thanks to Angela Olsen Matthews and her husband, Peter Matthews, at Mead Meadow for their thoughtful and gracious generosity and hard work in hosting our scrumptious and serene summer picnic. You can visit Angela’s Instagram page @MeadMeadow

About Mead Meadow

We were invited to historic Mead Meadow, in picturesque Kittery Maine, to shoot our delightful summer outdoor meal. This water front paradise is a restored 140 year old farmstead, originally a 20 acre estate, was called Mead Summer House. Included: the main house, a horse and buggy carriage house, which is now a guest cottage, a boat house and the original well. The lovingly restored buildings are now nestled on 4 acres of manicured grass surrounded by wild and cultivated flowers, raspberry bush stands